TOKYO — Providers of in-flight connectivity (IFC) to commercial airlines say the challenges they face in North America and Europe are even more daunting in Asia, where resistance to paying for service is strong and the average airline size is small.

“We get asked: ‘The airline does not want to pay, the passenger does not want to pay. So what are you going to do to fix the business case?’” said Jags Burhm, senior vice president of satellite fleet operator Eutelsat, whose 172B satellite is scheduled to enter service after spending four months . . .

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